Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, “Up to now” 18 april 2003 - 31 december 2003

 


Onder het directoraat van Rudi Fuchs (1993-2003) bleef de voorgaande verzamellijn een aandachtspunt. Dat bleek onder meer door de verwerving van belangrijke werken van Amerikanen als Judd, LeWitt en bovenal Nauman (een neon- en een videosculptuur).
Daarnaast legde Fuchs het accent op Duitse kunst met o.a. Baselitz en Lüpertz.
Ook werd de Engelse kunst nauwlettend gevolgd (o.a. Gilbert & George).
Fuchs stond vooral bekend om zijn experimentele collectie-opstellingen, waarin werk uit verschillende stromingen en periodes met elkaar in een spannende dialoog werd gebracht.

Installation view, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. (18 april 2003 - 31 december 2003) Installation view, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. (18 april 2003 - 31 december 2003)

Installation view, Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam.

Rudi Fuchs, recently (2003) retired as Stedelijk’s artistic director, made the selection and arrangement in the first floor galleries as a way of saying farewell.
The ensembles that he has put together there testify to his great knowledge of the collection, and his unique way of looking at art: not chronological exercises or groups by art movements, but rather combinations according to a ‘poetic, suggestive methods’.
It is left to the viewer to discover the formal relationships and disentangle possible themes, asis done in this Stedelijk Museum Bulletin by Bert Jansen and Maurice Rummens.
All disciplines receive attention in “Up to now”. Extra space has been freed up on the ground floor for photography, applied art and graphic design from the 1960s and 1970s, about which there is more in this issue.
But anyone who might think that “Up to now” gives a complete overview of the collection at the Stedelijk would be wrong. Other high points are to be seen this summer in the “Gogh Modern” exhibition at the Van Gogh Museum.
Almost simultaneously the Nieuwe Kerk on the Dam offers a survey of 19th century art from the collection, in the exhibition “City & Country”.
In addition, the Hermitage in St. Petersburg will also be devoting a large exhibition to CoBrA, from the Stedelijk’s collection.
All in all, enough material for an extra-thick issue of the Stedelijk Museum Bulletin, in which the Museum’s rich collection takes centre stage.


Photo-edit: Sophie Coleman, 2003.